WXG

26th September 2014

Kyan presents WXG, a conference dedicated to creating cutting-edge web & digital experiences. With twin tracks, time to chat, lunch included & drinks to follow. Guildford, 26 Sep, 9am to 5pm – tickets just £99 exVAT.

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Speakers

  • Andy
    Budd

    The UX of user experience design

    Andy Budd

    The UX of User Experience Design

    UX design is all the rage at the moment, but how usable is it as a process? When the top industry experts can't even agree to its definition (or even it's existence) how are you supposed to bake it into your practice, let alone sell it to your clients? In fact should you or your clients even care?

    In this session Andy Budd will try to demystify some of the rhetoric and dogma floating around about User Experience Design, and explain what should and shouldn't matter to your business, your clients and your day-to-day work as a web designer.

    User Experience Designer and CEO of Clearleft, Andy is a best selling tech author, curates the dConstruct and UX London conferences and helped set-up The Brighton Digital Festival. Andy created Silverback, a low cost usability testing application for the Mac, and co-founded Fontdeck, a web typography start-up. Andy is a regular speaker at international conferences like The Web 2.0 Expo, An Event Apart and SXSW. In May 2010, Wired Magazine named Andy one of the top 100 most influential people in the UK digital sector, much to the pride of his mother and the surprise of everybody else.

  • Peter
    Cooper

    The future of code

    Peter Cooper

    The future of code

    The tools, paradigms and techniques behind computer programming are constantly evolving. Spanning the developments in both academia and industry, Peter Cooper takes a look at recent research and advancements in the worlds of programming languages, computer architecture and developer tooling, and speculates on how the programming world of 2020 and beyond may look.

    Peter Cooper is a publisher, programmer and author, who sends weekly newsletters to over 170,000 programmers each week, primarily in the open source world. He also chairs O’Reilly’s Fluent HTML5 and JavaScript conference.

  • Jon
    Hicks

    Icon design process

    Jon Hicks

    Icon design process

    Icons are more than just pretty decorative graphics for sites and applications, they are little miracle workers. They summarise and explain actions, provide direction, offer feedback and even break through language barriers. Whether you design icons yourself or just need to be able to work with them, this session will take you through the whole process of designing and deploying resolution independent icons – from the initial brief, to choosing format or method to deploy them. On the way it will cover choosing the right metaphor, achieving visual balance and using techniques such as icon fonts and SVG for scalable and lightweight distribution.

    Jon Hicks is a Graphic Designer and Gentleman, based in Oxfordshire. He runs Hicksdesign with his wife Leigh and is most widely known for his work on the Firefox, Mailchimp and Shopify logos, as well as recent projects such as the Skype emoticon redesign. He also quite literally wrote the book on Icons: “The Icon Handbook” for Five Simple Steps Publishing.

  • Robin
    Johnson

    Navigating the NoSQL landscape

    Robin Johnson

    Navigating the NoSQL landscape

    Considering using a NoSQL database? The terminology surrounding NoSQL and BigData are confusing to IT professionals trying to select the right storage for the right problem. This presentation explores the technical reasons you might select one of these NoSQL databases, the types of databases available, their correct use and 'quintessential' use cases for them. We will weigh-up the strengths and weaknesses of both relational and non-relational databases, seeing real life use cases from some major names!

    A Polyglot Programmer and Developer Evangelist at SendGrid, currently working amongst the world-wide developer community to ease the adoption of the technology. Having spoken at some of the world's leading technical conferences, Robin is building his way to being a player in the London tech scene; attending, speaking at, and even helping organise multiple large events.

  • Laura
    Kalbag

    How we design the web

    Laura Kalbag

    How we design the web

    These days, “web designer” is used to describe all sorts of jobs and people. I’m going to discuss what we really create when we design for the web, where our responsibilities and loyalties lie, and how we hone our design skills.

    Laura Kalbag is a designer easily excited by web design and development. Among her list of ever-changing pet subjects are responsive design, accessibility, web fonts and design theory, but she's really fascinated by anything in the areas of web, mobile and design.

    Laura has been a freelancer for the whole of her professional life. She revels in working with small and meaningful clients, creating websites, apps, icons, illustrations and the odd logo.

  • Steve
    Marshall

    We can mirror it for you wholesale

    Steve Marshall

    We can mirror it for you wholesale

    How do you build world-class, highly scalable web applications without access to the Internet? How can you take the useful pieces of the Internet with you to a Napoleonic sea fort… and why would you even want to?!

    After spending a year building a suite of open-source tools to clone large chunks of the Internet, Steve realised there are far wider applications for this than “I want to live in a fort without Internet access”, and that decoupling can be a good thing for you, your team, your infrastructure, and your software.

    If he ever grows up, Steve Marshall wants to be a mighty pirate. Until then, he has to make do with being a software architect. He's worked on travel APIs, military-grade software, sites for burgeoning rock bands, award-winning intranet portals, and a host of things between.

    When he’s not working or complaining on Twitter (@SteveMarshall), he can be found listening to music, playing videogames, taking more photos than he has time to process, or going very fast round corners in his car. One day, he might blog on http://nascentguruism.com/ again. One day.

  • Stuart
    Memo

    The amazing sounds of JavaScript

    Stuart Memo

    The amazing sounds of JavaScript

    From the theremin to the sampler via the synthesizer and drum machine, technology has always shaped the sound of popular music. While the web has become the most popular way of sharing music, it’s never been used to make it. That is until now. The Web Audio API enables us to design and create instruments and audio effects from scratch using JavaScript. This talk will not only show you how to do this, but why it’s the future of making music.

    Stuart is a senior developer for the BBC in Glasgow. He spends much of his time experimenting with HTML5 and the Web Audio API. These experiments usually result in projects with silly names. See Qwerty Hancock and Abbey Load to name just a couple.

  • Miriam
    Quick

    Creating strong information graphics

    Miriam Quick

    Creating strong information graphics

    Infographics are everywhere, but making one that stands out from the crowd involves balancing the demands of data, design and storyline. This talk will go through the process of creating information graphics manually, from initial concept to finished piece, and show how visualisation can make dry data come alive.

    Miriam Quick is a researcher specialising in infographics and data visualisations. She has worked on topics from the HPV vaccine and climate change to arm wrestling and the science behind 'superfoods'. A regular contributor to informationisbeautiful.net, her work has also been published by WIRED, BBC, Guardian and others.

  • Xavier
    Riley

    Coding music – as easy as Pi

    Xavier Riley

    Coding music – as easy as Pi

    I believe 2014 will be the year that music arrives on the web. Not just listening to music - I'm talking about composing, collaborating and performing music too. Using a new educational tool called Sonic Pi, we'll run over everything you need to know to start coding music. You might even learn the Ruby programming language in the process!

    We'll look at:
    How - you make sounds with code.
    Why - code has advantages over traditional tools like GarageBand and Logic.
    Where - you can find people coding music to find out more.

    Xavier is a music graduate who lost his way and ended up programming for the web. He is currently working with OpenCorporates on the largest open database of company information in the world and hacking on side projects in his spare time. When not making bleeping noises with SonicPi, he can be found playing double bass and guitar in big bands around the South East.

  • Andrew
    Nesbitt

    Hardware hacking with JavaScript

    Andrew Nesbitt

    Hardware Hacking with JavaScript

    Anything that can be written in JavaScript, will eventually be written in JavaScript. First client side web apps, then server side programs and now you can control hardware, embedded devices and even flying robots with JavaScript.

    We'll look at how you can get started writing JavaScript for Arduino and Raspberry Pi to read sensors and control servos and build your own JavaScript powered robots.

    Andrew is a passionate full stack developer. He spends most of his days programming in Ruby, playing with Node.js, contributing to open source projects and organising local developer user groups. He also aspires to one day take over the world with a fleet of JavaScript powered quadcopters.

  • Laurent
    Sansonetti

    RubyMotion

    Laurent Sansonetti

    RubyMotion

    Talk details coming soon.

    Laurent is the founder of HipByte and lead developer of RubyMotion. He worked at Apple for 7 years as a senior software engineer, on both iLife and OS X. A long time rubyist, he created and still maintains the MacRuby project. In a previous life, he worked on IDA Pro and was an active contributor to RubyCocoa and GNOME.

  • Jon
    Tan

    Reverting to type

    Jon Tan

    Reverting to Type

    A little over a third of the top 1,000 websites in the world use web fonts, but more goes into choosing type than a pretty face that renders well across devices and browsers. Type affects everything, from how our audiences feel, to how they complete tasks.

    This talk discusses the science behind the type, and how we choose and set it to help our clients and audience tap away happy.

    Jon Tan is a designer and typographer, who co-founded Fontdeck and advises organisations such as the BBC on screen fontography. He designs branding, websites, and interfaces from Mild Bunch HQ, a co-working studio he runs in Bristol, UK. Jon writes for publications like Typographica, 8 Faces, and 24 Ways, and speaks at events such as An Event Apart. In his spare time he designs and makes wallets and desks, and gets wrestled into submission by his two sons.

  • Matt
    Taylor

    Illustration – points of reference.

    Matt Taylor

    Illustration – points of reference.

    Between coffee table design books and aspirational websites, it's way too easy to fall into the trap of making work that looks like everyone else's. Looking outside your own creative discipline can set you apart from the crowd.

    Matt Taylor is an illustrator and comic artist based in the Sussex countryside who spends his days drawing expansive Americana inflected illustrations and telling stories with pictures with a nod to the classic comic book art of the fifties and sixties. His clients have included Penguin Books, The New Yorker, Mondo and Burton Snowboards.

  • Robin
    Whittleton

    CSS: Who thought that was a good idea?

    Robin Whittleton

    CSS: Who thought that was a good idea?

    CSS has gone through a lot of evolution over the last 20 years leading to a wealth of technologies and techniques. As front-end developers we now have more tools in our belts than ever before, but how did we get here?

    This talk aims to unravel who came up with what to get us to where we are now, and to expand on who is driving CSS forwards.

    Robin is a senior front-end developer for Kyan. He gave up history as a subject aged 14, but luckily being on the web since 1994 has given him plenty of time to prepare this talk.

  • Line up complete

    See the schedule

Sponsors

WXG wouldn’t be possible without the support of our wonderful sponsors. If you’d like to join them and be part of the event, please contact us.

Get in touch

Location

WXG takes place at G Live in central Guildford, just a short walk from the mainline station, 35 mins by train from London Waterloo.

View directions

Schedule

  • Reception Room, 1st Floor

  • 09:00

    Registration

    Pastries and beverages

  • 09:30

    Opening remarks

    Stalls foyer

  • 09:40

    Laura Kalbag

    How we design the web

  • 10:30

    Jon Tan

    Reverting to type

  • 11.15

    Morning break

    Biscuits and beverages

  • 11:45

    Andy Budd

    The UX of user experience design

  • 12:30

    Lunch

    Finger buffet

  • 13:30

    Robin Whittleton

    CSS: Who thought that was a good idea?

  • 14:20

    Matt Taylor

    Illustration – points of reference

  • 15:05

    Afternoon break

    Cakes and beverages

  • 15:30

    Miriam Quick

    Creating strong information graphics

  • 16:20

    Jon Hicks

    Icon design process

  • 17:00

    Closing remarks

    Drinks

  • Studio, Lower ground floor

  • 09:00

    Registration

    Pastries and beverages

  • 09:30

    Opening remarks

    Stalls foyer

  • 09:40

    Peter Cooper

    The future of code

  • 10:30

    Xavier Riley

    Coding music – as easy as Pi

  • 11.15

    Morning break

    Biscuits and beverages

  • 11:45

    Laurent Sansonetti

    RubyMotion

  • 12:30

    Lunch

    Finger buffet

  • 13:30

    Stuart Memo

    The amazing sounds of JavaScript

  • 14:20

    Robin Johnson

    Navigating the NoSQL landscape

  • 15:05

    Afternoon break

    Cakes and beverages

  • 15:30

    Steve Marshall

    We can mirror it for you wholesale

  • 16:20

    Andrew Nesbitt

    Hardware hacking with JavaScript

  • 17:00

    Closing remarks

    Drinks

See the speakers

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Information

Code of conduct

WXG is dedicated to providing a harassment-free conference experience for everyone, regardless of gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, or religion. We do not tolerate harassment of conference participants in any form.

Harassment includes offensive verbal comments related to gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, religion, sexual images in public spaces, deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of talks or other events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention.

Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately. If a participant engages in harassing behavior, the conference organisers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning the offender or expulsion from the conference with no refund. Sponsors are also subject to the anti-harassment policy. In particular, sponsors should not use sexualised images, activities, or other material.

If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact a member of conference staff immediately.

Conference staff will be happy to help participants contact venue security or the police, provide escorts, or otherwise assist those experiencing harassment to feel safe for the duration of the conference.

Need Help?

Conference organisers: info@wxg.com / 07545 150 967

Thanks for coming!

This document is based on codeofconduct.com, licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.


Refund policy

We can refund tickets (or swap names on tickets) up to one working week before the event, so the latest date would be Thursday 18th September. So just contact us if your WXG plans need to change.


Website accessibility

Kyan strives to provide a friendly and accessible experience to all users.

We want as many people as possible to be able to access the information on both this site and the systems we build. If at any point you find yourself having difficulty using this site or one of our systems then please get in touch; we’d love help you access the information you need and see how to improve our sites in the future.

Recognised limitations

While we have strived to make our site accessible, there are some limitations.

Although we will always aim to communicate in as clear manner as we can, some of our blog posts, due to their technical nature will require a reasonable level of technical understanding.

Where third-party software solutions are used, for example hosted videos, we will look to use services that provide a more complete accessibility offering, such as closed captioning.

Customising your browser

It’s often helpful to customise your browser to help you make the most of this website and the internet in general. The BBC have a good guide at My Web My Way.

Our technical approach

Where possible we follow the guidelines given by the W3C in the WCAG 2.0. We believe these to be the most up to date guidance when it comes to the accessibility of websites and web applications.

All content images used in this site include descriptive alternative text (using alt attributes). Purely decorative graphics include empty alt attributes.

All forms follow a logical tab sequence. Labels are associated with their respective input fields.

Scripting is used on the website to improve usability, but it is possible to browse the website without scripting.

This site uses stylesheets for visual layout. If your browser or browsing device does not support stylesheets at all, the use of structured semantic markup ensures that the content of each page is still readable and clearly structured.

Last updated: 9th May 2012


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The information contained in this website has been prepared solely for the purpose of providing general information about the WXG event organised by Kyanmedia Ltd.

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is accurate, it does not constitute any form of advice, recommendation, representation, endorsement or arrangement by Kyanmedia Ltd.

The information presented is believed to be reliable but it’s subject to change at any time without notice. Kyanmedia Ltd. do not guarantee its completeness or accuracy. By accessing this website you agree that Kyanmedia Ltd. will not be liable for any direct, indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of the information and material contained in this website or from your access of other material on the internet via web links from this site.

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Introduction

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The Company’s privacy policy sets out the ways Kyan processes personal data. This privacy policy only relates to personal data collected by Kyan via the Kyan website. Any personal data collected by Kyan is used in accordance with data protection legislation.

This privacy policy does not apply to personal data provided to Kyan by any other means or via any other website. Users should be aware that if they provide personal data to other companies, the privacy polices of those companies determine the uses to which that information is put and Kyan’s privacy policy will no longer apply.

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Personal information provided to Kyan via the Kyan website will be used for the purposes outlined at the time of collection.

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